1963 Martin 000-28c Converted. SN189073. Guitar Database. For sale

Martin | 000-28c converted to 00042 | 1963 | SN:189073

1963 Converted Martin 000-28c guitar. SN189073. Guitar Database.

Guitar Database

We present and highly recommend viewing the pdf version of this article first as it contains the most up to date information and more photos.
The HTML version can be viewed below in it’s original, unaltered form.

 

Luthier Facts :
Name: Martin
Location: Nazereth, PA

Wait list: Sockists Worldwide
Taking Orders?: Yes, standard & customs
RIYL: Martin have set the benchmark for a lot of builders and manufacturers.
Note: (RIYL) Recommended If You Like


-HTML Version Below-

For Sale through Goodacoustics.com see more here

 

1963 Converted Martin 000-28c guitar. SN189073. Guitar Database.

1963 Converted Martin 000-28c guitar. SN189073. Guitar Database.

  • Model: 000-28c converted to 00042 by John Greven
  • Year: 1963
  • Top: Adirondack Spruce from West Virginian Smoky Mountains
  • Back and sides: Brazilian Rosewood
  • Neck: Mahogany
  • Nut Width: 1 13/16″
  • String Spacing: 2 1/4″
  • Scale: 25.4″
  • Body Length: 20 1/2″
  • Lower Bout: 15″
  • Upper Bout: 11″
  • Body Depth: 3 1/4- 4 1/4″
  • Bridge: Ebony
  • Binding: Ivoroid
  • Rosette: Abalone
  • Backstrip: Marquetry
  • Purfling: Abalone, 42 style

1963 Converted Martin 000-28c guitar. SN189073. Guitar Database.

1963 Converted Martin 000-28c guitar. SN189073. Guitar Database. 1963 Converted Martin 000-28c guitar. SN189073. Guitar Database.

1963 Converted Martin 000-28c guitar. SN189073. Guitar Database.

1963 Converted Martin 000-28c guitar. SN189073. Guitar Database.

The Conversion.

This is a 000-28c from 1963 which has been converted to a 00042 style by John Greven. John worked as a repairman in George Gruhn’s shop for a number of years and really pulled out the stops. He slimmed the neck from 2″ to 1 13/16″ and managed to use the old steel tuners for the peghead. The bindings were salvaged as was the finish for the back and sides!

The Topwood.

The topwood is Adirondack Red Spruce obtained from John Arnold. This particular top is from an old tree in the Smokies Mountains which John Arnold explains:

“The Great Smokies National Park contains the largest continuous stand of old growth red spruce remaining anywhere. Many of those trees exceed 500 years in age. In October 1995, the remnants of Hurricane Opal came through East TN and Western NC. The heavy rains and high winds combined to fell some 400+ year old red spruce trees in a landslide. The landslide covered US 441, which is the only highway bisecting the park. Normally, all fallen trees in National Parks are protected. They cannot be removed for any reason. But the necessity of clearing a Federal highway led to the decision to remove the trees from the park. By law, once the trees left the park boundary, they became property of the contractor. That is the loophole that allowed me and Ted Davis to obtain those logs. The red spruce from those 400+ year old logs was extremely tight-grained (up to 65 grains per inch).”ver seen, it has very complex tiny grain patterns with nice coloring. “

This particular top has fantastically tight grain 60 per inch and is cut on the quarter, displaying excellent silking. There is some hard colouring especially in the joined area, but it on the whole a very high grade top.

The Back and Sides.

The figured back and sides on this guitar deserves a special mention. The spiderwebbing is as extensive as I have ever seen and is very well bookmatched. As far as vintage Martins go, this is one of the most figured Brazilian rosewood back and sides I have seen.

The Result.

After an initial break in period of a few months, this guitar has opened up nicely with an impressive balance coupled to exceptional volume and response. The overtones have a particular depth to them and the speed with which the guitar reacts to nuances in playing. The volume, response and overtones were the characteristics from the early 12 fret 00028s I really wanted to have in this guitar and I am very pleased to say that John Greven has pulled off a miracle in succeeding!

Guitar Database

References: Martin Guitars, a History by Mike Longworth.

Pictures ©2009 T.Tan

Errors are unintentional although we try very hard not to make them- corrections or feedback are always welcome! Guitars are property of individual owners.
Any infringement of copyright is entirely unintentional. Any copyright issues should be address to: writers@guitarbench.com. We will attempt to resolve these issues quickly. Guitars remain property of respective owners.

189073
Share